Mowing your Lawn doesn’t have to be as hard as it is made out to be- Expert Tips to Mow your Lawn like a Champ

Imagine the most strenuous, back-bending, and labor-driven day of your entire life. Now imagine feeling like you were hit by a truck, over and over again, only to have you bounce back and ready for the next punch in just the right time. Well, that’s exactly how I used to feel every time I was asked to mow my lawn. Yep, you read that correct! No mountain climbing and high-intensity workouts for me. Simply mowing the lawn once every month was enough exercise to feel like a trip to hell and back.

Unfit, wasted, and lazy as hell I know but in my defense, I can say that it was a long time ago. Almost 15 years ago actually and boy, am I happy to admit that a lot has changed from then. You see, I realized I was doing things wrong and decided to take things under my control. I now clock a five-mile run every day and never say no to mowing the lawn. Well, I don’t have to. In addition to waking up from my laid back slumber, I’ve also learned and mastered the art of mowing the lawn. Yep, you’re now talking to an expert in the business and at Orlando Lawn Service, we take great pride in doing what we love to do- providing the best landscaping service for your garden! Well, how’s that for a change?

Going by my landscaping experience, I believe mowing is arguably the most neglected and underrated aspect of lawn maintenance.  Well, understandably so, given the sheer time and effort people put in executing the wrong technique. You see, good lawn-mowing technique doesn’t only mean you cut the grass short. On the contrary, there’s a lot more to it than that. How you mow, when you mow, and what you do with everything that you’ve mowed all accounts to how your lawn will turn out to look at the end.

Here’s where most people go wrong:

They cut the Grass too short!

   

 

 

Let’s face it, most people are of the mindset that cutting the grass real short will mean they have to mow less often (I was too until I realized how terribly wrong I was). Some lawn-owners scalp their lawns, using golf-putting greens as their benchmark. Well, ask someone who’s been there, done that, and has learned from it all and I’d say scalping your lawn or cutting the grass too short (unless recommended for specific reasons) are the worst things you can do while maintaining your lawn.


Here’s why:

Scalping or cutting the grass too short in a way that it’s equivalent to decapitating them puts a lot of stress on the grass (and we thought we were doing them good). Anxious and battered, the grass kicks into survival mode, demanding more moisture and nutrition so as to re-group and heal. Worse, by cutting the blades short, we end up reducing the supply of chlorophyll to the plant. With limited fuel source to rebuild itself, the grass succumbs to drying out faster, leaving room for the likes of weeds to germinate better and faster.

The Best Way out:

Cut your grass about 3 inches high. You’ll be surprised to know how the uniform length can do wonders to the life and appeal of your lawn. What’s more, contrary to common misconception, grass cut at the ideal height tends to grow slower than grass cut too short ( shorter blades invoke aggressive growth levels in their attempt to rebuild and re-surface).

They do not cut it Often enough

It’s relatively common for people to extend the time frame between mowing their lawn. They wait for the grass to grow to very long heights only to whack it way back all at once. Most people believe doing so will translate to little effort but that’s where they’ve got it wrong.

The Downside:

Besides running the risk of clogging your mowers and being left with piles of lawn clippings to get rid of ( translating to more work if you ask me), drastic trimming ( or decapitating )  can put undue stress and trauma on the grass, forcing it to demand more nutrition and supply to recover in less time. It’s important to note that irrespective of your wish, the grass will want to recover in quick time. It will therefore demand more supply so as to heal and regrow into its natural state (only faster and more aggressively this time).

The Best Way out:

Always mow your lawn often enough to ensure you’re never getting rid of more than one-third of the blade length at a time. Now, this might translate to weekly or bi-weekly mowing sessions during peak growth period, but in view of the health and long-term appeal of your lawn, it’s worth the effort. Alternatively, you can also reach out to us at Orlando Lawn Service. We offer weekly service between the months of April and October and bi-weekly (twice a month) service between the months of November and March.  Trust us to leave your lawns looking as pristine and lush as you can imagine it to be- yes, all year long!

They bag the Clippings

Many lawn-owners believe bagging any clippings and mulch will help keep their lawn neat and prevent thatch-a spongy layer between the soil and grass blades that causes problems to the plants’ growth over time.

Contrary to another misconception (we’ve had a few already), grass clippings do not promote the build-up of thatch. In fact, grass clippings are packed with food essentials such as nitrogen and minerals, all of which have been stripped off from the soil. Letting the clippings decay around the plants will help replenish some of the lost nutrients into the soil.

The Best Way out:

The key to good lawn-mowing is to mow often enough so as to maintain blade lengths of 3 inches. Not only will doing so keep your lawn looking and feeling more healthy, but it will also ensure you have a small packet of clippings ( read essential food supplements for plants) to feed your soil with.

So there you have it- expert tips to become a skilled mower and not a lawn butcher. You can follow the tips mentioned in this as well as our other blogs (and we have plenty to share) or call us at Orlando Lawn Service and allow us to serve you.  We’d be delighted to fulfill your dreams of owning a luscious green turf and look forward to hearing from you soon.

Reference: http://www.weekendgardener.net/lawn-care/mowing-tips-040904.htm